TORNADO ALLEY

[ONGOING PROJECT]

THIRTEEN MINUTES

Is the average time that you have to take shelter when a tornado warning is issued in Tornado Alley, this area where 1,396 twisters have hit the ground in 2017, killing 35 people.

 

SIXTEEN MINUTES

Is the time that Moore’s inhabitants had in 2013 to save their lives when an F-5 tornado, the most violent storms with winds between 261 and 318 mph, touched the ground. This Oklahoma City suburb lost 10 people, including 7 children.

 

NINETEEN MINUTES

Is the time that Joplin’s people had to take shelter in 2011 when the deadliest tornado since 1950 in the US stroke this 50,000 people city in Missouri, killing 161 of them.

 

Many companies offer tornado shelters that decrease significantly the risk of being trapped under debris or took away by the winds. But the average cost of that kind of shelter is 5,068 dollars. Not every private individual or municipalities have the means to buy one of them.

This project's aim is to document the daily life after the winds have settled, and all there is left is debris and chaos.  You cannot predict what force or trajectory a tornado will take and become, all you have to do is hide and take shelter as quickly as possible. I settled for a couple of week in Joplin last June, to document the population's resilience, how they reacted and healed after such a disaster . Some of the victims assure they have seen some big butterfly man protecting them from the wind and all the sharp objects that could hit you at more than 350 Km/h. 

To see more images of this project, please feel free to contact me.